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Global infrastructure services firm Aecom is reportedly developing one of the UK’s first 3D-printed commercial products made from graphene-reinforced polymer.

Aecom has produced a graphene arch using additive manufacturing techniques. It believes the method could reduce the time and cost of installing digital signalling systems and transform the digitization of transport networks. The 4.5-meter high, lightweight arch is being tested on outdoor track at Network Rail’s workforce development center in Bristol.

The company’s CNCTArch is designed to drive down the costs associated with installing digital signalling systems on transport networks. Using a graphene arch that sits over rail tracks eliminates the need to attach new digital equipment to existing infrastructure.

Aecom employees came up with the concept of CNCTArch in response to its transport clients’ challenges around the cost and time of digitizing the signalling systems on their networks. The company looked at replacing the traditional bolt and screws method of deploying digital systems in tunnels, which takes four shifts to install, by developing an arch on which the digital technology is attached, that doesn’t bolt to any existing infrastructure and takes only one shift to install.

The CNCTArch can be used in both tunnels and open environments and has the potential to transform the deployment of digital traffic management systems, Aecom believes. Read full story here.

3-D printed graphene arch

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

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Graphene 4-layer insulator includes other 2D materials for heat protection in electronics

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Collaboration of researchers from Stanford, NIST, Theiss Research and several others have designed a new graphene 4-layer insulator that consists of atomically thin layers, to protect electronics from excess heat.

The heat protector can reportedly provide the same insulation as a sheet of glass 100 times thicker. “We’re looking at the heat in electronic devices in an entirely new way,” said Eric Pop, professor of electrical engineering at Stanford and senior author of the study.

The heat protector relies on the fact that heat is actually a form of high-frequency sound. Once the team approached the problem from that angle, they were able to devise an innovative solution.

To soundproof homes, people often install multi-paned windows. “We adapted that idea by creating an insulator that used several layers of atomically thin materials instead of a thick mass of glass,” said postdoctoral scholar Sam Vaziri, the lead author on the paper.

The researchers used a layer of graphene. They then added three other similar materials, each only three atoms thick, to create a four-layered insulator that was just 10 atoms thick. The end result is an incredibly thin insulator that is effective because the atomic heat vibrations are dampened and lose much of their energy as they pass through each layer. Read full article here.

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

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Graphene sensors that measure air quality are step closer to mass market

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Graphene-based sensors that can measure the quality of air using the 2D Material could soon enter mass production thanks to a new partnership between a University of Manchester spin-out company and Chinese corporation, Tunghsu Optoelectronics.

Tunghsu Optoelectronics, who are part of The Tunghsu Group, is investing nearly £1million in Riptron Ltd over two investment stages. Riptron Ltd is a spin-out company founded by two scientists from the University’s Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Dr Max Migliorato and Dr Rakesh Kumar.

The spin-out has been supported and driven forward by the University’s Intellectual Property arm, UIMP and Graphene Enabled. Graphene Enabled is a business created and owned by the University to launch market-focused ‘spin–out’ companies for graphene based-products.

VIP representatives from all parties signed the agreement in a special ceremony at the University on Friday 16 August. Dr Migliorato said: “I am thrilled that a company of the reputation of Tunghsu has showed such enthusiasm for our sensor technology, which was entirely developed at the University of Manchester. I am also confident that, together, we are going to make a global success of graphene electronic products.”

Tunghsu Optoelectronics is a leader in China’s graphene industry and has seen its graphene-related business grow rapidly in recent years. It already produces four products including graphene-based lithium-ion batteries, graphene energy-saving lighting, graphene thermal management systems and graphene anti-corrosion coatings, where in 2018, the industrial application of graphene reached 181 million yuan, an increase of 170% year on year.

It will now work with Drs Migliorato and Kumar and The University of Manchester to add the new range of air quality sensors to its growing graphene portfolio. Dr Kumar added: “I believe working together we can provide a technology solution for real-time air-quality mapping to help the local governments introduce new levels of environment, health and safety regulations.” Read full article here.

Graphene Air Quality SensorsAbout the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

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Graphene takes a step towards enabling end-users to maintain their own resistance standards

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Collaborative research advanced graphene assisting resistance standards. Recent research by NPL, Oxford Instruments, Chalmers University and Graphensic has enabled the quantum Hall effect to be realized at both lower magnetic fields and higher temperatures, whilst still retaining part per billion accuracies.

The long-term collaboration between NPL, Chalmers University of Technology and Graphensic has resulted in a big advance in graphene samples. Epitaxial graphene (epigraphene) has been grown on silicon carbide and has better performance at higher temperatures and lower magnetic field than was previously possible. In practical terms, it has also removed the difficult process of fine-tuning the carrier density and means the ‘table-top’ system can be warmed up and cooled back down and the plateau stays where it is set with no user intervention.

NPL, Chalmers University of Technology and the national metrology institute of Sweden (RISE) have demonstrated the metrological quality and stability of these types of devices for up to two years.

NPL in collaboration with Oxford Instruments is developing a table-top primary standard of resistance incorporating both a graphene quantum Hall effect device and a cryogenic current comparator in the same cryostat, in order to provide a compact and easy-to-operate system for metrology laboratories.

JT Jansen from NPL explains the importance of this work: “One of the aspirations of quantum metrology is to deliver primary standards directly to end-users. Epitaxial graphene has enabled us to demonstrate significantly shorter traceability chains and more accurate measurements, with a more accurate and compact piece of equipment. This is a step change in capability and an exciting development.”

Sergey Kubatkin from Chalmers University of Technology explains more: “With the new definitions of certain units within the International System of Units (SI) coming into effect since May 20th 2019, the epigraphene-based quantum Hall devices are used to disseminate not only the electrical units, but also other standards relying on electrical measurements, such as the unit of mass, the kilogram.” Read full article here.

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

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Bar-Ilan University Israel welcomes Chinese graphene lab

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Established in 1949, the CAS is China’s national academy for the natural sciences and is responsible for 104 research institutes, and five universities and supporting organizations.

The laboratory, which will work together with researchers from other Israeli institutions, will focus on research in the fields of nano-medicine and two-dimensional material engineering, especially the production of graphene. The material, the strongest known to man, can be used to print foldable screens that are only one-tenth of a nanometer wide.

The agreement between the CAS and Bar-Ilan University was signed at Beijing’s National Center for Nanoscience and Technology by Prof. Yuliang Zhao, the director of the center, and Prof. Dror Fixler, head of the Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Bar-Ilan University.

“This significant collaboration, amounting to several million yuan, ultimately aims to create opportunities for new jobs,” said Fixler. “This is an initiative that will lead to the economic growth of both China and Israel.” Read full article here.

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

 

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Nanotube fibers rewire damaged hearts

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Scientists at Texas Heart Institute (THI) report they have used biocompatible fibers invented at Rice University in studies that showed sewing them directly into damaged tissue can restore electrical function to hearts.

“Instead of shocking and defibrillating, we are actually correcting diseased conduction of the largest major pumping chamber of the heart by creating a bridge to bypass and conduct over a scarred area of a damaged heart,” said Dr. Mehdi Razavi, a cardiologist and director of Electrophysiology Clinical Research and Innovations at THI, who co-led the study with Rice chemical and biomolecular engineer Matteo Pasquali.

“Today there is no technology that treats the underlying cause of the No. 1 cause of sudden death, ventricular arrhythmias,” Razavi said. “These arrhythmias are caused by the disorganized firing of impulses from the heart’s lower chambers and are challenging to treat in patients after a heart attack or with scarred heart tissue due to such other conditions as congestive heart failure or dilated cardiomyopathy.”

Results of the studies on preclinical models appear as an open-access Editor’s Pick in the American Heart Association’s Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. The association helped fund the research with a 2015 grant.

The research springs from the pioneering 2013 invention by Pasquali’s lab of a method to make conductive fibers out of carbon nanotubes. The lab’s first threadlike fibers were a quarter of the width of a human hair, but contained tens of millions of microscopic nanotubes. The fibers are also being studied for electrical interfaces with the brain, for use in cochlear implants, as flexible antennas and for automotive and aerospace applications.

The experiments showed the nontoxic, polymer-coated fibers, with their ends stripped to serve as electrodes, were effective in restoring function during month-long tests in large preclinical models as well as rodents, whether the initial conduction was slowed, severed or blocked, according to the researchers. The fibers served their purpose with or without the presence of a pacemaker, they found. Read the full article here.

National Conference series kicks off in Jackson.

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

 

 

 

 

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10 atom thick graphene heat shield protects electronic devices

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Stanford researchers used a layer of graphene and three other sheet-like materials – each three atoms thick – to create a four-layered insulator just 10 atoms deep.

Excess heat given off by smartphones, laptops and other electronic devices can be annoying, but beyond that it contributes to malfunctions and, in extreme cases, can even cause lithium batteries to explode.

To guard against such ills, engineers often insert glass, plastic or even layers of air as insulation to prevent heat-generating components like microprocessors from causing damage or discomforting users.

Now, Stanford researchers have shown that a few layers of atomically thin materials, stacked like sheets of paper atop hot spots, can provide the same insulation as a sheet of glass 100 times thicker. In the near term, thinner heat shields will enable engineers to make electronic devices even more compact than those we have today, said Eric Pop, professor of electrical engineering and senior author of a paper published Aug. 16 in Science Advances.

“We’re looking at the heat in electronic devices in an entirely new way,” Pop said.

Detecting sound as heat

The heat we feel from smartphones or laptops is actually an inaudible form of high-frequency sound. If that seems crazy, consider the underlying physics. Electricity flows through wires as a stream of electrons. As these electrons move, they collide with the atoms of the materials through which they pass. With each such collision an electron causes an atom to vibrate, and the more current flows, the more collisions occur, until electrons are beating on atoms like so many hammers on so many bells – except that this cacophony of vibrations moves through the solid material at frequencies far above the threshold of hearing, generating energy that we feel as heat. Read full article here.

 

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

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Graphene R&D Tax Credits May Be Overlooked

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A company which assists clients in successfully commercializing graphene suggests that graphene R&D credits may be overlooked, simply because companies developing graphene are often unaware of the tax credits available to them.

Technology-based start-up companies typically have teams that know a great deal about the underlying technology and may have fully educated themselves on the commercial markets that they’re targeting for their products. However, knowing the intricacies of different funding mechanisms, or the finer points of corporate tax law, typically are not their strengths.

For the past 22 years, Leyton has been offering an international portfolio of clients a way to maximize the government funding initiatives that are available to them that they may not even be aware of.

Recently, Leyton became a Corporate Member of The Graphene Council and this gave us the opportunity to ask them about their business and what they can do for companies that are trying to succeed in commercializing graphene. Here is our interview with Kaneez Fizza, Marketing Manager for Leyton USA.

Q: Can you explain a bit of how your company works and what you provide your clients?

A: Leyton is a global innovation funding consultancy dedicated to helping our clients improve their business performance through utilization of research and development (R&D) tax credits. Our in-house  team  of  highly  experienced  scientists,  engineers,  tax  consultants  and  attorneys produce innovative and sustainable strategies to achieve the maximum eligible financial return, without impacting on a company’s core business or security. We save our clients’ time and generate a tax benefit while maintaining the highest quality of service. We achieve this by adapting to our clients’ environment and time constraints, and by minimizing their involvement, so they can stay focused on their core functions. Leyton only charges a fee if a credit is identified. We follow a clear methodology built on tested know-how and in full compliance with current legislation.

Q: Essentially, then, your company assists innovative companies in reclaiming R&D tax credits. Could you outline the countries and regions that offer R&D tax credits for companies in the graphene sector?

A: R&D tax credits are offered globally, and can be applicable to various industries, including Material Science, Aerospace, Energy, Electronics, Medical Applications, Automotive, Construction, and many more. Companies developing the graphene material itself, new graphene-based processes or graphene-based products, will all be eligible, irrespective of what industry they operate in. Thanks to Leyton’s 25 regional offices in 11 countries, we are able to work closely with our clients, while our international presence gives us a strong global footprint, diverse sector expertise and the ability to benefit our clients on a global scale. Read full article here.

 

 

1st in a National Series of Regional Conferences

About the National Graphene Association (NGA)

The National Graphene Association is the main organization and body in the U.S. advocating and promoting the commercialization of graphene. NGA is focused on addressing critical issues such as policy and standards development that will result in effective integration of graphene and graphene-based materials globally. NGA brings together current and future graphene stakeholders — entrepreneurs, companies, researchers, developers and suppliers, investors, venture capitalists, and government agencies — to drive innovation, and to promote and facilitate the commercialization of graphene products and technologies. Join NGA here.

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Lighter Than Feather, Stronger Than Steel And Highly Conductive, Mississippi Business To Lead Graphene Future

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Oxford, Mississippi- Mississippi businesses and industries will get a first-hand look at a new technology future at the Graphene Innovation & Research Conference, to be held in Jackson, Mississippi, on November 19-20.

Sponsored by The University of Mississippi, Mississippi Development Authority and the National Graphene Association (NGA), the Conference will acquaint and prepare Mississippi businesses and industries with the coming technology revolution envisioned by the NGA and partners to promote ‘Mississippi State Of Graphene.’

“Graphene is the thinnest, strongest, most conductive material ever known. Scientists predict it will impact all areas of technology. Mississippi business and industry should be prepared for the enormous opportunities graphene will offer. The NGA is working with state leaders to locate a national graphene program in Mississippi, ” said Dr. Ed Meek of Oxford, NGA Founder, and CEO.

Based in Oxford, MS with offices in Nashville, TN, the NGA is coordinating the conference that will bring together leaders from academia, industry, and government funding agencies to focus on recent advances in graphene innovation and research, bridging the gap between lab and industry and enabling graphene-focused technologies.

“This conference is the continuation of NGA initiatives to support the needs of graphene current and future stakeholders. The Jackson conference follows the American Graphene Summit on Capitol Hill supported by Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS). This event focuses on graphene research, innovation, and its impact on regional and national economic development, ” said Dr. Zina Jarrahi Cinker, Executive Director of the NGA.

Josh Gladden, Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs at the University of Mississippi, says “The establishment of the Graphene Innovation and Research Conference as an information exchange between academic and government scientists and industry is a critical step in transitioning graphene-based technologies out into products and tools that can benefit society.  The University of Mississippi and the Center for Graphene Research and Innovation are thrilled to participate and support this inaugural conference in our home state.”

During the first day of the conference, leading scientists and scholars will share the most recent research, innovation, and trends in the field of graphene and start building a robust graphene research network within the U.S. The second day of the event will address economic development and industrial impact enabled by graphene. With the inaugural year of the Graphene Innovation & Research Conference focusing on the Southeast region and held in Mississippi, the following years will take place in different regions of the country to advance graphene development and partnerships throughout the nation.

For additional information on attending or exhibiting visit bit.ly/girc2019 or contact Torkel Bjarneman at torkel@nationalgrapheneassociation.com.

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Register Now For the Graphene Innovation & Research Conference!

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The National Graphene Association is honored to host the Graphene Innovation & Research Conference.

The two-day conference will bring together leaders from academia, industry and government to focus on recent advances in graphene innovation and research, bridging the gap between lab and industry and enabling graphene-focused technologies that will have a significant regional and national economic impact.

Highlighted speakers will include: Dr. James Tour (Rice University), Dr. Lawrence Drzal (Michigan State University), Dr. Ahmed Al-Ostaz (University of Mississippi), Dr. Joshua Robinson (Penn State University).

Register to attend the first ever Graphene Innovation & Research Conference here.

Learn more about sponsoring here.

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